Does TLS retransmit corrupted messages?

Summary

+ TLS does not retransmit corrupted messages.

Details

1. Introduction to TLS
2. TLS and Message Integrity
3. Retransmitting Corrupted Messages
4.

Conclusion

1. Introduction to TLS
Transport Layer Security (TLS) is a cryptographic protocol designed to provide secure communication over the internet between two parties, such as a client and a server. It provides security for web browsers, email servers, and other applications that require secure data transmission. TLS is built on top of the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), which is responsible for establishing and maintaining a connection between the two parties.

2. TLS and Message Integrity
Message integrity is critical to ensure that messages sent over the internet are not tampered with or corrupted during transmission. TLS provides message integrity by using cryptographic hash functions, such as SHA-1 or SHA-256, to create a unique digital fingerprint of each message. This digital fingerprint is then encrypted and appended to the message before being transmitted.

When the recipient receives the message, they use the same hash function to recreate the digital fingerprint of the message and compare it with the one sent by the sender. If the two digital fingerprints match, it means that the message has not been tampered with or corrupted during transmission. If the digital fingerprints do not match, then the message has been tampered with or corrupted, and the recipient will reject the message.

3. Retransmitting Corrupted Messages
TLS does not retransmit corrupted messages because doing so would defeat the purpose of providing secure communication. If a message is corrupted during transmission, it could be an indication that the message has been tampered with or intercepted by a third party. By retransmitting the corrupted message, TLS would be allowing the attacker to successfully compromise the security of the communication.

Instead, TLS will simply discard the corrupted message and request that the sender resend the message. The sender will then create a new message with a new digital fingerprint, which will be transmitted securely over TLS. This ensures that only uncorrupted messages are transmitted between the two parties and that the communication remains secure.

4.

Conclusion

TLS is designed to provide secure communication over the internet by ensuring message integrity and confidentiality. By not retransmitting corrupted messages, TLS maintains the security of the communication and prevents attackers from successfully compromising the security of the communication.

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