Does TLS 1.3 include the auth tag from GCM in the record?

Summary

:
– TLS 1.3 does not include the auth tag from GCM in the record.
– Instead, it uses a combination of AEAD (Authenticated Encryption with Associated Data) and PRF (Pseudorandom Function) to ensure security.
– This article provides an overview of TLS 1.3’s encryption protocol and how it differs from previous versions.

Details

:
1. Introduction
– TLS (Transport Layer Security) is a cryptographic protocol that ensures secure communication between two parties over the internet.
– It has gone through several iterations, with TLS 1.3 being the latest and most advanced version.
– One of the main changes in TLS 1.3 compared to previous versions is its use of AEAD instead of GCM (Galois/Counter Mode) for encryption.
2. TLS 1.3 Encryption Protocol
– TLS 1.3 uses a combination of AEAD and PRF to ensure security.
– AEAD provides both confidentiality and integrity in one operation, which reduces the number of operations required and improves performance.
– PRF is used for key derivation, handshake messages, and other cryptographic operations.
3. GCM vs AEAD
– GCM is an authenticated encryption mode that provides both confidentiality and integrity protection.
– However, it requires a separate authentication tag to ensure integrity, which can increase the size of the encrypted data.
– AEAD, on the other hand, combines encryption and authentication into one operation, reducing the size of the encrypted data.
4. TLS 1.3 Record Layer
– The record layer in TLS 1.3 is responsible for encrypting and decrypting data sent between the two parties.
– It uses a combination of AEAD and PRF to ensure security.
– The auth tag from GCM is not included in the record layer, as it is unnecessary given the use of AEAD.
5.

Conclusion

– TLS 1.3’s encryption protocol is more secure and efficient than previous versions due to its use of AEAD and PRF.
– The auth tag from GCM is not included in the record layer, as it is unnecessary given the use of AEAD.
– This article provides a comprehensive overview of TLS 1.3’s encryption protocol and how it differs from previous versions.

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