Does Microsoft Edge (Spartan) share Cookies Cache Passwords or TLS Certificates with Internet Explorer?

Summary

: Yes, Microsoft Edge shares cookies, cache, passwords, and TLS certificates with Internet Explorer.

Microsoft Edge, formerly known as Project Spartan, is a web browser developed by Microsoft as part of Windows 10. It was introduced in July 2015 to replace the aging Internet Explorer as Microsoft’s primary web browser. Despite the new interface and features, Microsoft Edge still shares some data with its predecessor, Internet Explorer.

1. Cookies:
Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer share cookies. This means that if you visit a website using Edge, the cookies will be saved and can be accessed by Internet Explorer when you visit the same site using it. This feature allows users to have a consistent browsing experience across both browsers. However, this sharing of data can also pose security risks as malicious websites can use the shared cookies to access personal information stored in other browsers.

2. Cache:
Both Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer share cache data. The cache is a temporary storage area on your computer that stores web pages, images, and other files to speed up loading times for future visits. Sharing cache data can help improve browsing speeds across both browsers, but it also means that if one browser’s cache gets corrupted or filled with unnecessary data, it can affect the performance of the other browser as well.

3. Passwords:
Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer share passwords stored in the Windows Credential Manager. This feature makes it easy for users to log in to websites without having to enter their login information every time they visit. However, this sharing of data can be a security risk if your computer is compromised as an attacker could gain access to all saved passwords across both browsers.

4. TLS Certificates:
TLS (Transport Layer Security) certificates are used to secure communication between a browser and a website. Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer share these certificates, which means that if you trust a certificate in one browser, the other will also trust it. This sharing of data can help improve security by ensuring that both browsers trust the same websites, but it also means that any issues with a certificate in one browser could affect the other as well.

In conclusion, Microsoft Edge shares cookies, cache, passwords, and TLS certificates with Internet Explorer. While this sharing of data can help improve the user experience by providing a consistent browsing environment across both browsers, it also poses security risks that users should be aware of.

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