Does Java’s implementation of OCSP and CRL checking handle intermediate CAs?

Summary

:
– Yes, Java’s implementation of OCSP and CRL checking does handle intermediate CAs.

Details

:
– 1. Understanding the Concepts:
– a) Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP): It is an Internet X.509 public key certificate-based online status protocol, used to validate the revocation of digital certificates. OCSP allows for checking the revocation status of an SSL/TLS server certificate in real-time.
– b) Certificate Revocation List (CRL): It is a list of digital certificates that have been revoked by the issuer before their expiration date. A CRL can be used to verify if a certificate has been revoked or not.
– c) Intermediate CA: An intermediate CA is a certification authority that issues certificates for other CAs, rather than directly to end-users. It acts as a link between the root CA and the end-user’s certificate.
– 2. Java’s Implementation of OCSP and CRL Checking:
– a) OCSP Stapling: In Java, OCSP stapling is used to enhance the performance of OCSP checks by reducing the number of requests sent to the OCSP responder. The server includes the OCSP response in its TLS handshake, which eliminates the need for the client to send an additional request to the OCSP responder.
– b) CRL Checking: Java’s implementation of CRL checking involves downloading the CRL from the CA and checking if the certificate is included in it. If the certificate is revoked, the connection will be terminated.
– 3. Handling Intermediate CAs:
– a) OCSP Checking: When Java checks for OCSC, it uses the chain of trust to verify the intermediate CAs. If an intermediate CA is not in the trusted store, the check fails.
– b) CRL Checking: Similarly, when Java checks for CRLs, it uses the chain of trust to validate the intermediate CAs. If an intermediate CA is not included in the CRL, the check still passes as long as the end-entity certificate is not revoked.
– 4.

Conclusion

:
– Java’s implementation of OCSP and CRL checking handles intermediate CAs by using the chain of trust to validate them. This ensures that all certificates in the chain are valid, even if they are issued by an intermediate CA.

Previous Post

Are there any vulnerabilities in TLS 1.0 that can NOT be avoided by proper implementation?

Next Post

Detecting(and locating) rogue DHCP server on a local area network

Related Posts