Are the rules used to validate certificates in the major browsers documented anywhere?

Summary

* Yes, the rules used to validate certificates in major browsers are documented.

Details

1. Introduction
* Certificate validation is an essential component of secure communication over the internet. It allows users to verify the authenticity and integrity of websites they interact with. Major browsers such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari implement certificate validation rules to ensure that only trusted certificates are accepted.
2. Browser-specific Certificate Validation Rules
* Each browser has its own set of rules for validating certificates. These rules are documented in various sources. For example:
1. Google Chrome – The Chrome SSL/TLS Configuration Guide provides detailed information on the validation rules used by Chrome. This guide explains how Chrome verifies the certificate’s issuer, validity period, and the revocation status of a certificate. It also includes details on how Chrome handles self-signed certificates, intermediate certificates, and other special cases.
2. Mozilla Firefox – The Mozilla Certificate Policy provides comprehensive information on how Firefox verifies certificates. This policy explains the validation rules for certificate issuers, validity periods, and revocation status. It also includes details on how Firefox handles self-signed certificates, intermediate certificates, and other special cases.
3. Internet Explorer – The Microsoft TechNet article “Certificate Trust List (CTL) for Windows” provides detailed information on the validation rules used by Internet Explorer. This article explains how Internet Explorer verifies the certificate’s issuer, validity period, and the revocation status of a certificate. It also includes details on how Internet Explorer handles self-signed certificates, intermediate certificates, and other special cases.
4. Safari – The Apple Support article “Configure SSL and TLS settings in Safari” provides information on the validation rules used by Safari. This guide explains how Safari verifies the certificate’s issuer, validity period, and the revocation status of a certificate. It also includes details on how Safari handles self-signed certificates, intermediate certificates, and other special cases.
3.

Conclusion

* The rules used to validate certificates in major browsers are documented, providing users with transparency and allowing them to understand how their browsers verify the authenticity of websites they interact with. These documentation sources provide detailed information on the validation rules for certificate issuers, validity periods, revocation status, self-signed certificates, intermediate certificates, and other special cases.

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